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SFU Co-op Student

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Taking care of your body, mind, and spirit is important for the long haul!

You just came back from your summer vacation. Or for many students, you are enjoying the short break after completing your summer semester’s final exam. Now it’s a good time to think of ways you can relax and recharge for the fall, as this busy schedule with various obligations and commitments can take a toll on your body.  

Here are a few things you can do to relax and recharge for fall:

  1. One thing that many students lack is exercise. The amount of hours spent in front of the computer, reading textbooks, and completing assignments can be deteriorating to a student’s body. The same could be said for those who work full-time in an office. So go outside and enjoy the sunshine by going out for a walk or a run. Another idea -- if you haven’t played basketball in a while, visit your local basketball court and play an energizing game of one-on-one. Either way, any physical activity is good as it lowers your stress and improves your overall health. Ideally, you should add a little bit of physical activity in your everyday routine, whether it is the summer or not. By getting your heart pumping, your body will be healthy and ready to take on all the fall semester and beyond. 

  2. You are often reading to complete university assignments and work responsibilities. Clear your mind from all the stress and read something that is outside of your studies or work. Go read something for pleasure. If you enjoy fiction -- pick up a Twilight novel. You could also pick up the latest copy of Time magazine and be up-to-date with current events. By reading, you will also be exposed to innovative ideas and new words to incorporate into your own writing. Or you could just impress your colleagues about how much you know about news happening around the world! 

  3. You most likely have an agenda that keeps track of all the deadlines for school assignments and projects. Consider taking it one step further by creating an agenda to articulate your personal goals. This will help you organize and monitor achieving these goals. For example, if you want to find a job, you could identify smaller step-by-step short-term goals to achieve the ultimate longer-term goal of finding a job. Perhaps to begin, one short-term goal could be to find a volunteer opportunity to develop new skills and gain more work experience. 

"The goal you set must be challenging. At the same time, it should be realistic and attainable, not impossible to reach. It should be challenging enough to make you stretch, but not so far that you break."

- Rick Hansen

These are only a few activities to consider doing to relax and recharge in preparation for a hectic, yet fruitful fall semester.  Remember; taking care of your body, mind, and spirit is important for the long haul!

SFU Co-op Student

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