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As part of questioning the methods, meanings and actions put forward by government to date, we follow three community voices who offer more insight into reconciliation as a topic, issue, and reality.

Reconciliation has been on the radar since June 2008 in Canada, but what is reconciliation and how exactly do we put it into practice? With the complex issues Indigenous people face in modern day society, and the trickling effects of the past, the concept of reconciliation and the actions that surround it, some would argue has yet to find, or be, a resolution.

As part of questioning the methods, meanings and actions put forward by government to date, we follow three community voices who offer more insight into reconciliation as a topic, issue, and reality.

Made by Maddi Grier, who is from the Blackfoot confederacy and majoring in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies, and Communications, at Simon Fraser University, this short film takes a hard look at the question: Can we reach reconciliation?

SFU Student
Maddi is currently an undergraduate student at Simon Fraser University she is studying Gender Studies and Communications working towards freelance journalism through film. She is very active in advocating for and supporting Indigenous Voices. She holds close to her heart issues such as Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, Two Spirited Indigenous People, and Indigenous Womanism. She is co-creator and publisher of a Zine called ‘I AM, Indigenous Alternative Media’, raising awareness of Indigenous issues while providing a platform for Indigenous peoples by Indigenous people. She also has set goals of creating documentaries in the future that are directed towards Indigenous issues as well as issues that intersect with the BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, people of colour) communities.
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Apr 4, 2018

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