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SFU Co-op Student

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Ronald Yeung at his workstation
My work experience at the OSB has largely opened my eyes to the numerous career paths possible within the Public Service of Canada.

This article was originally published in the Summer 2014 Arts Co-op Newsletter.

“Bankruptcy” is a word no one wants to hear. It is a word with negative connotations and usually means one is no longer financially stable. However, what many do not know is that Canada’s bankruptcy system is restorative and designed to help insolvent individuals get back onto their feet and reestablish their lives. 

The Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy is located within Industry Canada’s 20+ agencies, boards, and offices. Through maintaining the efficiency and effectiveness of the insolvency system, promoting awareness of the rights and responsibilities of the parties involved, and ensuring trustee and debtor compliance within the legislative and regulatory framework, the OSB contributes to Canada’s marketplace by protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy and insolvency system.

The majority of my work at the OSB involved statistical analysis of the Vancouver Office’s operations, as well as that of the Western Region. In addition to generating various reports, I had the opportunity to assist Bankruptcy Analysts with their Annual Banking Reviews, evaluate the applications of individuals wanting to obtain their Bankruptcy and Insolvency Counselor licenses, and work on Trustee Compliance, Debtor Compliance, and Complaints-related projects. With a willing-to-learn attitude and support from my managers and co-workers, I was able to successfully complete the projects I was assigned.

My work experience at the OSB has largely opened my eyes to the numerous career paths possible within the Public Service of Canada. As Canada’s largest employer, the Public Service offers employment in every field possible. From Accounting to Forestry, to Health Sciences to Mathematics, there are many one-of-a-kind careers within the Public Service. In addition, the federal government is an employer that believes in growth and potential. It is often willing to send employees to courses and programs to improve their ability to perform their duties. Furthermore, the Public Service offers competitive salaries and benefits for their employees.I recommend all co-op students complete a work term in the public sector. Regardless whether you are working for a municipal organization, a provincial agency, or a federal department, the experience is career changing. In addition to gaining new transferable skills, the ability to work with professionals from all walks of life and different career paths is an experience that would change the way you look at your own career goals and the path needed to get you there.

    Beyond the Blog

    SFU Co-op Student
    Ronald Yeung is a SFU Career Peer Educator studying Criminology, Business, and Sociology. He is always looking for opportunities to meet new people and try new things.

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