Skip to main content
Communication, Art + Technology › Communication › Public + Community Relations
International Association of Business Communicators, Canadian Public Relations Society
SFU Co-op Student

man standing on rock looking at sky
Credit
pexels.com
Everyone has a passion or dream occupation that they would love to have. For most of them, however, their career choice is based on someone else telling them that to be successful, you have to be.

70,000 hours. To do what? Well, according to Gillian Watters, director of programs at KEYS Job Centre in Kingston, Ontario, 70,000 hours is the amount of time you will spend at your job over the course of a lifetime. While that number may seem ominous, that is how long you are going to spend for the rest of your life that will pay the bills. However, how many times have you heard of people say “do what you love, and love what you do?” Well, read on to find out how you can spend 70,000 hours doing what you love.

Everyone has a passion or dream occupation that they would love to have. For most of them, however, their career choice is based on someone else telling them that to be successful, you have to be
Dr. IQ9000, or be a wall-street business broker. That is not the case, as “no one should make their career decisions to please anyone but themselves,” according to Watters. So how does one follow their passion?

  1. Research – If pan flute making is what you enjoy and love doing, then you should really come up with a plan before explaining it to your parents. That means researching the necessary schools and programs, and formulating how you are going to point A to B. This shows your parents, or whoever that may be asking, that you are committed and that you’ve done your homework.

  2. Follow-Through – So your boy/girlfriend/parents are now supportive of your choice to go to motorcycle stunt-riding school, that’s great! Now you owe it to yourself to follow through. You’re an adult now, which means that only you hold yourself accountable, so making sure you attend all your classes is important! You fought this hard to get where you are!

  3. Stay Motivated – It’s very easy to give up in the face of pressure of external factors, such as other people. However, this can be quite the benefit. Feeling pressure from your parents? Prove them wrong by being the best in your class. This shows that you are excelling, and that helps considering you are doing what you love to be doing.

Beyond the Blog

  • This article is based off a publication by JobPostings.ca. Read the whole story here.

International Association of Business Communicators, Canadian Public Relations Society
SFU Co-op Student
Mike Wong is an aspiring Public Relations Professional, interested in Crisis Communications and Content Strategy. Connect with Mike on Twitter.
visibility  79
Oct 17, 2012

You Might Like These... Volunteering, Community Engagement, Professional Development, Personal Development, Life Balance

STC West Coast
Alumnus Profile: How Crystal Kwon Advanced Her Career Through Volunteerism

Students often overlook one important benefit of volunteerism. While students realize that scholarships and bursaries usually require community engagement, they often forget that volunteerism can also give you the edge you need after you finish your degree.

Kyle and volunteers
Kyle Jung: Expand Your Horizons through Volunteering

Did you know that you can make a difference through volunteering, as well as discovering your passions and career goals? These are just some of the benefits of volunteering, according to Kyle Jung, a 5th-year SIAT student who is also the Vice President of Operations, Interactive Arts & Technology Student Union (IATSU) and the SFSS Forum Representative.

Volunteers
Jordan Robinson: Volunteer, Learn & Have Fun!

Do you want to improve your writing and communications skills? Do you want to meet other SFU students? If you answered “yes” to any of the two questions, becoming a peer educator may just be right for you! Let Jordan Robinson, a 4th-year Sociology student, tell you what valuable skills and experiences.

You Might Like These... Co-op Reflections

Ryan and his teammates at the gay pride parade
Three Lessons from Twenty-Four Months on the Job

"I’d be hard-pressed to say I have my life figured out – I really don’t."  Ryan shares what his Co-op journey has taught him and some tips for anyone who is currently doing Co-op.

Group photo at WorkSafeBC
Discovering my Career Path in Investment Management

My university experience has been a roller coaster to say the least. From moving to a brand-new city without knowing anyone to embarking on multiple co-ops in finance related roles, I discovered who I wanted to become and the path I needed to take to get there.

man sitting at office desk holding dog
Why Co-op is the Most Important Thing You Can Do as an International Student

Being an international student from Bangladesh, I always felt that I did not have the necessary network to succeed in the Canadian workforce even though I feel strongly about my ability to work hard and grow. I felt anxious when looking at my peers who have been working in a job since the age of 16 whereas I was just getting started. This is when I was introduced to SFU Co-op.