Skip to main content
Communication, Art + Technology › Communication
SFU Alumni

empty
a flatlay of a person using an ipad to browse images
Credit
unsplash.com
If you feel intimidated about blogging, don't fret: there are other ways you can establish a positive online presence

While researching for another OLC article, I stumbled upon a blog post that enumerates five reasons why every college student should start blogging. According to Ryan Healy, the author of the article, starting a blog may help you land that dream job someday. Drawing from his own experience as a blogger, Healy says blogging may help you differentiate yourself, may help you show your true personality to potential employers, and may help you make important connections. 

Sounds like a good deal, right? Before you open a blog today, there are some things you need to consider. As a blogger myself, I can personally attest that while the technical aspect of blogging is easy, generating content isn't. Blogging, unfortunately, requires more planning that one might expect.

To start a blog that will represent you professionally, you might need to first identify your blog's niche and purpose. If you'd like your blog to be able to help you land that dream job, identify what your ideal job is so you make sure that it matches your blog's content. You may not be sure exactly what you want to do in the future, but having a general idea of what you're aiming for will help you mould the content of your blog.

A second important consideration is the time commitment. Successful bloggers usually have at least one new entry per week. That may not sound a lot, but if you're taking a few classes, working part-time or doing co-op, and trying to maintain a healthy lifestyle, adding this to your schedule may prove challenging. If you open a blog and don't post new items regularly, readers may become disinterested. More importantly, though, it may also give potential employers the impression that you can't follow through with a commitment.

Finally, and perhaps your most important consideration, blogging requires that you open up a bit more about yourself. When readers visit your blog, they might expect some facts or some news, but they're mostly concerned about your opinions and thoughts. This might be scary. To accurately represent yourself professionally through your blog, you need to carefully plan what you'd like to say in each post and how you'd like to say it. To ensure that you're not giving potential employers the wrong message, make it a habit to preview your post before publishing it.

If you have a blog that professionally represents you, don't be afraid to use your real name on it. As Healy pointed out, it may give you that extra edge that you need. If blogging intimidates you but you'd like to try it in the future, your best bet is to start contributing to other established blogs. This gives you an opportunity to practice while getting valuable feedback from experienced bloggers. At SFU, for example, you can contact Online Learning Community to see if you can become a volunteer writer. Your byline in these articles should appear on a Google search, so becoming a volunteer writer is one of the easy ways to brand yourself online while also building your writing portfolio.

Just a final note - blogging isn't really for everyone. As I've noted in this article, blogging requires thoughtful planning and time commitment. If you feel intimidated about blogging, don't fret: there are other ways you can establish a positive online presence (LinkedIn, Twitter, etc.). Blogging is just one of the many ways you can use to depict a professional image if a potential employer searches your name online.

Beyond the Blog

SFU Alumni
Marketing professional Kelvin Claveria graduated from SFU in 2011 with a Business Administration major and a Communication minor. Before joining Dunn PR and Global Bend, Kelvin held communications roles at eBay and SFU Volunteer Services. In his free time, Kelvin volunteers for IABC/BC and blogs about digital marketing and music.

You Might Like These... Prospective, Professional Development, Career Exploration

Co-op students jumping in the air
The Co-op Connection Helps Retention

In this blog post, Heather shares with us why co-op is an important experience for all students, whether it be to further career aspirations or to gain future employment opportunities. 

author, courtney, smiling
A Second Term in Government: More of the Same?

Having completed my first work term for Health Canada as a Communications Officer Intern, I was eager to try something new, and the government was not where I believed that was going to happen. That is until I was offered a position at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada...

Working on campus
The 10 Minute Commute – Resources and Useful Information for Working on Campus

Have you ever thought about working in a place that you are familiar with?  Perhaps a Tim Horton’s close by? For many students the idea of working at SFU might be a great option, if you prefer a 10 minute jaunt to work after class or an opportunity to learn more about how a university operates.

You Might Like These... Professional Development

Two line cooks preparing food
The Value of “Meaningless” Part-Time Work

Not a lot of people have the luxury of being able to go through post-secondary education without holding down a job. I was one of those poor souls, slaving away at seemingly menial, shamelessly servile jobs to pay the proverbial bills, sacrificing my weekends, evenings, and summers for The Man.

A photo of two women smiling to the camera
Pushing Through Rejections: The Co-op Hunt

Finding a co-op is no easy feat! Read on to see how Emily managed to find hers. 

A painted image of a person trying to rope in both the brain (on right) and the heart (on left). As a result the person is splitting from the middle.
The Path and Pursuit of Passion

We’re at a stage in our lives where internal conflict feels like it’s just another part of becoming an adult. None of these conflicts are, perhaps, greater than the life-altering crossroads of whether or not to follow your passion. This is what choosing the path of passion looked like for me.