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Chris Leung

he/him
SFU Student Undergraduate
Science › Biomedical Physiology + Kinesiology
Co-operative Education › Local Co-op

Representation of Networking - clusters of multicoloured board game pieces
The connections you make during a work experience will have a major impact on you. These relationships, which are formed through networking and interactions while working with one another, go beyond the work place and can evolve into lifelong mentors or even friends when your experience ends.

Learning effective networking strategies to use in a new work setting can provide the foundation for long-term success. Starting a co-op, volunteer or new work position is not only a great way to develop practical skills but can also help you build a professional network that might impact your future. Here are 6 networking tips that may enhance your experience and help you with your future career. 

1. Genuine Introductions: Introduce yourself to your colleagues and make a sincere first impression. Tell them you're excited to learn more and ask about their responsibilities. A friendly greeting establishes a good foundation for relationships.

2. Observation: Use your time observing, not only to learn the processes and procedures but also to understand team dynamics. Observe how colleagues communicate with each other, and learn from their interactions. 

3. Casual Conversations: Common areas and lunch breaks provide opportunities for casual conversations. Personal connections and understandings can be made through these seemingly simple conversations that go beyond the normal professional setting of the work environment

4. Participate in Group Activities: Take part in work parties, team-building exercises, or other organized activities. Because of the more relaxed setting, participating in these activities allows for the development of closer relationships. 

5. Connect Digitally: In the era of digital technology, networking goes beyond in-person meetings. You can make connections with professionals online through professional networks such as LinkedIn.

6. Seek Mentorship: Don't hesitate to ask a professional from the work place for mentoring. Find someone who shares your values or career interests and let them know you're interested in learning from their experiences. A mentor may provide direction for your career path by assisting with goal-setting, and decision-making.

The connections you make during your work experience will have a major impact on you. These relationships, which are formed through networking and interactions while working with one another, go beyond the work place and can evolve into lifelong mentors or even friends when the position ends. Participating actively in this community not only defines you as a student but also lays the groundwork for the next chapter in your professional career.  


Editor's note - Chris' posting was written for his co-op work term as a Rehabilitation Assistant in a clinical physiotherapy setting however the recommendations are beneficial for students or new graduates starting in any new position therefore the posting was edited accordingly to generalize the content.

Author

Chris Leung

he/him
SFU Student Undergraduate
Science › Biomedical Physiology + Kinesiology
Co-operative Education › Local Co-op
visibility  153
Feb 27, 2024

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