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I feel that sometimes individuals are quite reluctant to volunteer because they fail to recognize just how valuable the skills that they acquire through volunteering really are.

I feel that sometimes individuals are quite reluctant to volunteer because they fail to recognize just how valuable the skills that they acquire through volunteering really are. That being said, I hope that this post will open your eyes to how skills from your volunteer experiences may be applied to a future career.

My last article touched on employability skills that you would most likely gain through volunteering: communication, interpersonal and time management skills. But how exactly could these apply to a future career?

Each skill parallels quite nicely to certain tasks that a workplace may have one do. As an example, I will show you how these skills could transfer nicely over to a future career as a lawyer:

1. Communication

  • Presenting one’s self and/or case clearly in court orally

  • Communicating one’s argument clearly both in writing and in spoken word (i.e. with reports and in court)

  • Communicating clearly with a client, witnesses, and other court officials

2. Interpersonal

  • Working well with clients, victims, witnesses, etc. in an efficient manner

  • Working with the media and public when addressing certain cases publicly

3. Time Management Skills

  • Prioritizing multiple cases and plan time out to work on them

  • Managing multiple appointments with multiple clients successfully

These are only a TINY sample of how these skills could apply to a career in law. There are many other tasks that these skills could be applicable to a vast number of careers that university students like you and I dream of having.

SFU Student
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Oct 21, 2014

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