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SFU Co-op Student

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You’ve met so many wonderful people, and have learned and grown so many skills in such a short amount of time. You’re continuing to grow so much as a person, and I’m so proud of that.

Dear Past Self,

Welcome to adulthood! You’re just starting university, and you’re feeling absolutely terrified of what the future holds for you, but I want you to know you have nothing to worry about. There are going to be some awkward and even mortifying moments, both in and out of school, but you’ll be okay! Dead-silent Zoom breakout rooms, the stress of co-op job interviews, and more are in store for you. None of it is going to kill you. I know you’re scared to fail, but don’t be afraid to take chances and make the most of the opportunities that are presented to you. You may have no clue of what you want to do with your life, but that’s okay. When the chance to do Co-op comes, don’t hesitate, since it will be one of the best things you do during university. It will be scary, and it’s a lot of work, but you’ll be one step closer to finding your dream job (and you’ll meet some pretty cool people along the way). You can do this!

Dear Present Self,

First of all, I’m so proud of you for making it to where you are now. After quite some time of confusion and lack of direction, you’re finally on your way! There have been some bumps in the road, and there’s still a long(ish) journey ahead of you, but you’ve learned so much. After three whole years of university, you’re finally finishing your first Co-op semester at the end of your fourth year. I know you’ve always been stressed out about taking too long to finish your degree, but I’m starting to realize that it actually might not be the end of the world. Your time doing Co-op so far has made such a difference to you as a student, an employee, and as a person.

You’ve learned how to communicate better, juggle tasks and responsibilities, and get high quality work delivered ahead of time. You’ve met so many wonderful people, and have learned and grown so many skills in such a short amount of time. You’re continuing to grow so much as a person, and I’m so proud of that. Your job right now is amazing, and even though there have been some days where you’re just not happy with yourself or your work, there isn’t even a minute where you regret applying to Co-op. Now, however, it’s time for some tough love.

Let’s be honest: you’re not the most responsible student, and your procrastination is something that has really been holding you back. Every time you start things last-minute, you’re only hurting yourself; although that may be exactly why you keep doing it. During Co-op you’ve done so well in trying to kick all of those bad habits from the past 3.5 years, but you need to make sure you carry what you’ve learned through this co-op, through the rest of university, and eventually, through the rest of your life. Sounds easy enough, right?

Dear Future Self,

I’m going to keep this short since I don’t know you yet, but I’m so excited to find out what you’re like. I hope you’re continuing to use all of the things you learned during your very first Co-op, and that you’re doing better than ever. I wonder if you’ve discovered your passion yet, and if you’re still in touch with all of the people who have helped you get to where you are, but I guess I’ll have to wait to find out. I hope you’re doing well, and I can’t wait to meet you!

SFU Co-op Student
Connect with Katie on LinkedIn

Posts by Author

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Applying for Jobs Outside your Faculty: Low Risk, High Reward

Meet Giulia Crovini, an Economics Co-op student. In this quick Q&A, Annelyse shares about her co-op experience. Specifically, she highlights the many benefits of applying for positions outside of your faculty.

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Blog
Opportunities are what you Make of it - An Interview with an Economics Student

Meet Ditij Beladiya, a student completing an Honours undergraduate degree with a Major in Economics, Concentration in Economic Data Analytics and Minor in Political Science. In this quick Q&A, Ditij shares about his co-op experience. Read about his interview, his day to day tasks and what he has learned.

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Blog
WHERE Are They Now: An Interview with a Former Master's Co-op Student

Many times, our co-op students graduate from our program, and use these experiences in future positions. Today, we will be interviewing a former student of ours, Fatima Sajid to see where she is now after graduation. Read about how her onboarding processes went, the skills she learnt and how her employers helped her develop said skills.

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A Second Term in Government: More of the Same?

Having completed my first work term for Health Canada as a Communications Officer Intern, I was eager to try something new, and the government was not where I believed that was going to happen. That is until I was offered a position at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada...

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Surviving Workplace Politics

Ever been peeved with workplace politics? Have you ever been a victim of office politics? One student shares her experiences from the workplace with tips on how to survive.

 

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Responsibility and Success

One of the most memorable parts of my time in co-op was the collection of accidents, errors, mistakes, and mix-ups that happened in the course of working in the laboratory.

 

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My First Work Term at Malaspina Labs

Patrick started his career as an elementary school teacher and now he is completing SFU’s Computing Science Second degree program. He shares how he got to the program and how co-op has been a great help!

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What I Didn’t Learn in Design School

Accepting a co-op internship, especially internationally, can be tough but once you earn the opportunity it can be a wonderful learning experience. Nikita was accepted for a UX design internship in Amsterdam and faced some unforeseeable challenges. Read on to find out some of the key lessons that Nikita took away from her experience.

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Why Being Smart Isn’t Enough

You meet a lot of intelligent people working in research, but intelligence isn’t going to get you far as a researcher. The ability to communicate with your peers and to external viewers is critical to being successful. Read on as Charlies shares his experience working amongst research lab groups and why it’s a valuable skill to be able to communicate to those both in and outside your field.