Skip to main content

Kim Huynh

SFU Student

empty
Kim looking into a folder
Many volunteer roles require you to work with others or with the public, so you will be socializing the whole time.

When I was a high school freshman, I (for whatever reason) did not see why I should get involved with my school and greater community through clubs and volunteering. It wasn’t until the eleventh grade in which I started to volunteer for the City of Surrey and joined my school’s Make-A-Wish club that I realized that I was missing out on a lot.

That being said, coming into university, I made a promise to myself that I would get involved as soon as possible and as much as I could in my first year. Now, perhaps some of you are just like how I was as a high school freshman. You may not see what the point of getting involved and volunteering your valuable “study” time is. However, here are 3 very cliché (but very true) reasons why you should get involved A.S.A.P.

1. You Get to Meet a Lot of New People (and Friends!)

When you volunteer, you meet a lot of people that you otherwise would not have met. You meet people through volunteer orientations, training sessions as well as through the volunteer role itself. This is particularly beneficial to first-year students who are looking for ways to make new friends, but are unsure how to get started. In addition, volunteering is a great way to network with people because you are able to work with those that have higher positions within the organization of wherever you are volunteering.

2. You Get to Build Your Resume

Of course, one of the major motivators is that volunteering helps add to your resume. Volunteering not only will help you add experience to your resume, but you will also be able to acquire new skills and showcase them on your resume. In addition, you may be able to list a volunteer coordinator, trainer or fellow volunteer as a professional and/or personal reference.

3. You’ll Feel Great

Super cliché, but often times, volunteering is extremely fun – especially if you are volunteering with (new) friends. Many volunteer roles require you to work with others or with the public, so you will be socializing the whole time. In addition to the fun that you will be having, you’ll also feel great knowing that you have donated your time to a good cause or have helped put an event together all on your own time! It definitely is the best reason to volunteer and it is very rewarding.

If you are not sure how to get started volunteering, check out local organizations (such as the BCSPCA or your local recreation centres) for some more information or go to https://www.sfu.ca/volunteer.html and opt into the volunteer e-newsletter where you will be notified of volunteer opportunities in and out of SFU.

About the Author

Kim Huynh

SFU Student
Jien Hilario photo
What’s in a Name? Coming to Terms With Labelling Myself as a Person With a Disability

If you were to see Jien on campus, you wouldn’t know that she had a disability. She does not use a wheelchair nor does she have a seeing eye dog. She has an invisible disability. In this article, Jien shares her journey on how she came to terms with labeling herself as a person with a disability. 

Injustice Anywhere is a Threat to Justice Everywhere
Why Doesn’t Canada Have a Disabilities Act?

It is 2018 and Canada has not yet implemented adequate protection and legislation for people with disabilities. When it comes to equality for all, Canada is falling far behind. In this article, Jien discusses the research and reality of why Canada needs a Disabilities Act.

We Can Do It!
How to Satisfy Your Inner Activist

When people think about social justice, they think of things like protests or hunger strikes, but the options don’t end there. These volunteer organizations can help you satisfy your inner activist.

You Might Like These... Volunteering, Sustainability

Iceberg Melting
What’s Your Cause? Polar Regions, Climate Change, Cultural Awareness, New Immigrant

Over the course of the past semester, SFU Volunteer Services set out to learn what causes motivate SFU students to get involved in their communities–either on campus or beyond. We collected information through the ENGAGE blog and want to highlight some now in hopes of inspiring others to think about what their cause is and how they can contribute!

Children playing hopscotch
An SFU student perspective on the Big Sisters Study Buddy program

You may have heard of them–you may even have an idea of what they do. But have you ever thought of being one? Big Sisters of BC Lower Mainland has been serving girls in one-to-one mentoring relationships since 1960, with the mission of “enhancing the confidence, self-esteem and well-being of girls through supportive friendships with caring women”. Each Big and Little Sister match gets together once a week for at least one year. 

Mubnii smiling with her hands in an open position, in front of an aquarium
Health Sciences Student Profile: Mubnii Morshed

Heath Sciences offer students one of the most comprehensive and diverse programs, focusing on everything from epidemiology, molecular biology to political science anthropology. These days, there are many volunteer opportunities associated with the Health Sciences.

You Might Like These... Networking

a group of SFU students smiling at the camera
Don’t Panic: Tips from Industry for Graduating Students

Are you graduating soon and are panicking about job searching in the “real world”? If so, read on to find out what some successful SFU alumni and co-op employers are saying about what grads can do to stand out.

A cup of coffee placed on a written planner with the word "goals" next to it
Getting Out of the Dumps and Back on the Hunt in a COVID Job Market

Like most soon-to-be graduates, Keeley was looking forward kick-start her career. And what better way to do it than to start looking for industry-applicable experience? But when COVID-19 hit, plans had to change. Read on to find out how Keeley overcame a saturated job market in the middle of a pandemic. 

Students posing for a picture
Aboriginal Student for a Day Event

The RSTC Aboriginal Student for a Day event will strive to match secondary students with SFU students that they can “shadow” for a half day of studies. Volunteers and “shadows” will be matched based upon their academic and vocational interests and aspirations.