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Des'ree Isibor

Beedie School of Business › Marketing
Work-Study

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Being an introvert has its own perks that can set you apart from others and make an impact on those around you!

Usually, when we think of a leader, we imagine a person who is very charismatic and always enjoys having people around them. The reality is that there are many leaders who are introverts and excel greatly in leadership positions. Just as there are peculiar personality traits that are typical of great leaders, introverts have traits that can make them outstanding leaders.

Here are four personality traits that introverts possess which can make them great leaders:

1. Great Listeners

Introverts are slow to speak and quick to listen to others. They have a great receptive capacity that can be instrumental in making decisions and carrying their team members along. We tend to expect leaders to always contribute or speak up first but listening helps to welcome different perspectives from the team. This skill also points to introverts as potential leaders that are not fixated on their own, singular idea but receptive of ideas and feedback from others. Introverted leaders can, in turn, set the tone for a more inclusive team environment.

2. Deep Thinkers

Introverts love to think through plans and decisions before jumping into them. Rather than making hasty decisions, they prefer to work through possible alternatives and analyze them first. Similarly, when introverts withdraw from people and all the chatter going on around them, they can reflect deeply. In their highly treasured “alone time”, deep insights and creative strategies can come to their minds. Introverted leaders can present big-picture analysis on team projects because of their deep thought processes.

3. Give Off a Calm Energy

It is no secret that introverts are low-key individuals. Introverted leaders can exude a calm energy that can be much needed, especially in situations when the team experiences a crisis or loss. This calm disposition can also instill confidence in other team members and give them reassurance when it is needed. 

4. Highly Observant

In the time when introverts are not chatting or engaging in social activities, they are busy making observations about others and their environment. As a leader, making observations and being able to read between the lines is very key. Introverted leaders can think deeply and observe information, strategies or tactics that may not be apparent to all team members. These observations can kick-start brainstorming, analysis, and strategy formulation among team members. By observing how focused you are on getting things done, your team members will also be influenced to do the same. As an introverted leader, make sure to capitalize on this trait and pass it on to your team members as well.

Introverts can be great leaders who are productive, inclusive, and focused on achieving team goals. Being an introvert has its own perks that can set you apart from others and make an impact on those around you! 

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Des'ree Isibor

Beedie School of Business › Marketing
Work-Study

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