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Robert Tanra

SFU Co-op Student
Beedie School of Business

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Two men in suits and ties sitting down, shaking hands
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Sebastian Herrmann on Unsplash
Learning to reward yourself will enhance your personal sense of accomplishment and pride, eventually fostering your can-do attitude.

While having lunch with the CFO of the company I’m currently working at, I asked her “What is the most important trait that you look for when hiring someone?”

She answered in an instant, “someone with a can-do attitude”.

This got me thinking, what is actually a can-do attitude?

Cambridge Dictionary characterizes a person with this attitude as someone who is very positive about his/her ability to achieve success. In other words: confident and self-reassured.

We know those people who are always ready to take on anything and no mountain is too high for them. They have seemingly incredibly difficult problems and yet, they do not seem to be frazzled by anything.

You, on the other hand, sometimes give up way too easily. Often you cannot do anything about circumstances; they knock you off balance, but it is really about how you react that determines the outcome. Then, how does one not bury himself in fear and worry at the thoughts of such hurdles? How do you accept the possibility of obstacles and embrace the uncertainty and eventually overcome them?

Here are some tips to get you started:

1. Alter Your Views on Fear

How we look at fear can immensely affect our sense of motivation. Instead of seeing fear as something that slows you down, see it as a challenge and opportunity. If you want to have a can-do attitude, continuously work on changing your attitude towards fear.

2. Plan and Execute

Having a can-do attitude stems from having confidence. When you don’t do what you promise, it shows that you are unreliable. By doing what you have planned to do, you will build a reputation for yourself and ultimately self-confidence, because you know you can trust yourself.

3. Reward Yourself for Completing Tasks

Having the perseverance to always do what you’ve planned is good, but self-motivation is also key. One great way to motivate yourself is to reward yourself for pushing yourself. We often see success as a long shot, and there is always little to no control over external rewards. Learning to reward yourself will enhance your personal sense of accomplishment and pride, eventually fostering your can-do attitude.

4. Think ‘Big’ Picture

Don’t see small tasks as delays, rather see them as a part of larger goals. Instead of focusing on your short-term wants, remember the long-term goals; remember the bigger picture. For example, staying late to help with a project at work could be beneficial for you in the future, as your employer will see you as a very hard-working person compared to other employees.

These tips will help you develop a can-do attitude and cultivate a strong belief in your personal ability to manage whatever life may bring. Above all, smile and be enthusiastic about what life has to offer for you. Remember, stay focused on your goals and keep the motivation going.

Beyond the Blog

  • Check out the Career Peers to connect with like-minded individuals, who will help build your professional repertoire!

About the Author

Robert Tanra

SFU Co-op Student
Beedie School of Business
Connect with Robert on LinkedIn

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