Skip to main content

Keely Rammage-Scott

SFU Student
Communication, Art + Technology

empty
A cup of coffee placed on a written planner with the word "goals" next to it
Remember, we have our whole lives ahead of us to get new experience and build our careers.

Getting a job at a grocery store was definitely not what I was expecting to do with my last summer before graduation. I had big plans to apply to marketing and communications student positions and to make the most out of my education and off-time to get relevant experience, but when COVID-19 hit, I knew I just needed a job in general.

I’d been looking forward to this summer all of spring semester. As a soon-to-be graduate from the School of Communications, with just a few credits left in my degree, I had begun looking for industry-applicable experience, hoping to identify some jobs I could apply to. I had big plans to make the most out of my education, apply for student positions in marketing and communications and beef up my resume, before being thrown headfirst out into the working world. Using my off-time to get relevant experience didn’t quite turn out the way I had hoped. Getting a job at a grocery store was definitely not what I was expecting to do with my last summer before graduation, but it is the option I had no choice but to take – for a while.

You might say I’ve had my fair share of experience in making adjustments. In the past four years, I’ve transferred schools, switched majors, added a minor and studied abroad. Despite my skills in being adaptable, there’s really nothing any of us might have done to prepare for a pandemic. We’ve all had different experiences dealing with COVID-19 and no one person is going to be put in the exact same situation due to a variety of circumstances. The impact on students is notable, with classes now online for the foreseeable future, and the different ways we are all dealing with the current uncertainty in employment.

Some of us have been lucky enough to find or maintain temporary work as we continue our studies. Others may have been planning on doing a co-op or getting work experience in their field of study and now need to re-route. I know I was feeling overwhelmed and stuck in one place because I was unable to find applicable job experience.

When COVID-19 hit, I knew I just needed a job in general. I found out a friend was working at a nearby store, I applied, and was hired on the spot. I’ll admit, I felt shame for taking something I wasn’t passionate about, but I felt a sense of purpose, stayed busy and the work environment was positive. If you’re in the same position, remind yourself that these are hard times! It’s okay to keep that same retail job you’ve had for 3 years now, or to take temporary work while you wait for the market to get stronger.

No one could have predicted that this is what our summer would look like, but there’s still time to search for a summer job that’s applicable to your field of study. Using the resources below, working with a career educator at CVS and not giving up, landed me the exact sort of position (in marketing and communications!) I’d been looking for. Here are a few options for students, if you’re feeling stuck:

1. Look Beyond Indeed!

There is no doubt that Indeed has become a helpful digital job marketing service over the last few years, but it isn’t the be-all-end-all! Many industries have their own tools that offer more specialized results catered to what you’re looking for. Facebook Groups, LinkedIn Alumni, and sites listed here, are great to watch, too.

2. Check for Canadian Government Resources

The Canadian Job Bank has a section on their website dedicated to students returning in the fall! Much like Indeed, you can use filters to narrow down location and job description. Since these jobs are meant for students, the competition will be thinner as well.

3. Don’t Discount Volunteering Quite Yet!

Volunteering may feel like a thing of the past for an experienced student, but it is still an amazing way to get experience while maintaining a job that pays the bills in these unprecedented times. You can earn up to $5000 for tuition by volunteering through the Canada Student Service Grant this summer.

Remember, we have our whole lives ahead of us to get new experience and build our careers. Finding a way to pay the bills didn’t stop me from continuing to search. If I can do it, you can too.

About the Author

Keely Rammage-Scott

SFU Student
Communication, Art + Technology
Keely Rammage-Scott is going into her final year of her Communications degree at SFU. Keely first delved into the world of journalism and blog writing during her time at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, where she wrote for their student paper The Runner.  She aspires to work in the entertainment industry after graduation.
Jien Hilario photo
What’s in a Name? Coming to Terms With Labelling Myself as a Person With a Disability

If you were to see Jien on campus, you wouldn’t know that she had a disability. She does not use a wheelchair nor does she have a seeing eye dog. She has an invisible disability. In this article, Jien shares her journey on how she came to terms with labeling herself as a person with a disability. 

Injustice Anywhere is a Threat to Justice Everywhere
Why Doesn’t Canada Have a Disabilities Act?

It is 2018 and Canada has not yet implemented adequate protection and legislation for people with disabilities. When it comes to equality for all, Canada is falling far behind. In this article, Jien discusses the research and reality of why Canada needs a Disabilities Act.

We Can Do It!
How to Satisfy Your Inner Activist

When people think about social justice, they think of things like protests or hunger strikes, but the options don’t end there. These volunteer organizations can help you satisfy your inner activist.

You Might Like These... Professional Development, Personal Development, Career Exploration, Life Experience

Marble statue of Socrates
Know Thyself

So you have graduated from university and are hanging your well-earned degree on your bedroom wall, and all of  a sudden, a tiny, yet unavoidable voice in the back of your head is quietly screaming “No time to celebrate, you need to find a job!” or “I’ve got my degree…what do I do with it?!’.

Mike, author
Indigenous Stories: Mike, SFU Alumni

"I have no solid plans for the future and I love it...I know that every experience that I have had, every failed plan, was really an excellent mistake that gave me the skills I need to handle any situation that gets thrown my way in the future."  Read Mike's story of career exploration, and how to handle constant change.

picture of glichelle pondering a though
Surviving Workplace Politics

Ever been peeved with workplace politics? Have you ever been a victim of office politics? One student shares her experiences from the workplace with tips on how to survive.

 

You Might Like These... Co-op Reflections

A photo of the author
The Long Way Around: How Co-op Made My Academic Detour Worthwhile

It has been six long years since I started at SFU, switching majors three times along the way. With such a convoluted path, it’s no surprise that life after school began to fall out of context. Thankfully, a well-timed co-op opportunity allowed me to refocus my life and reverse my dwindling academic attitude. 

Carmen smiling
Student Success Story: Carmen van Soest

"I hope to be someone that other Indigenous youth can look up to, and a person that others can count on in my everyday life. And hopefully I can get into Law school so I can help Indigenous peoples fight for their rights." Read Carmen's story of overcoming adversity, and their reason for continuing their education. 

Canucks Team
An Intern's Perspective

Marla Liguori is a Communications co-op student at SFU, and for her first Co-op experience she was able to spend the 2010-2011 season with the Vancouver Canucks as a marketing intern. She shared with us what she’s learned and why she thinks the Co-op program is a stellar addition to any degree.