Skip to main content

Student sitting in SFU library by window working on laptop
Credit
Quentin Beck
Health & Counselling counsellors understand how to help students overcome issues that cause academic distress like procrastination, exam anxiety, perfectionism, and problems with attention and motivation.

When you’re feeling stressed or overwhelmed, sometimes talking to someone can help. Often friends, family, and community are the best sources of support, but at other times you may benefit from professional care.

Common issues that bring folks to counselling include topics related to adjusting to major transitions, identity, decision-making, family and social relationships, and mental health concerns. Being a student health clinic, Health & Counselling counsellors also understand how to help students overcome issues that cause academic distress like procrastination, exam anxiety, perfectionism, and problems with attention and motivation.

Who are counsellors?

Registered clinical counsellors are trained professionals at the masters level or higher.  Counsellors use their training, education, and experience in each session and provide support through conversation. Feeling comfortable is important, because counselling is a human relationship, and if it’s the right fit you can hope to build a trusting relationship to help you work through problems and issues that may be impacting you and getting in the way of your success. 

Finding someone who shares a similar worldview may be something important to you when looking for a counsellor; for example, someone who shares your religion, culture, or identity. You may find this type of relevancy helpful for certain issues. Other times, you may feel entirely comfortable and at ease with someone who may not share these experiences. 

Many counsellors also work with more specific topics or issues and in some instances it can be helpful to access this kind of experienced support. For example, the SVSPO counsellor

Browse counsellor bios to learn more about our team, or make a request with My SSP for specific, culturally relevant providers with multiple language options available. Importantly, finding the right fit is important.

What’s counselling like?

At Health & Counselling, once it’s determined counselling is the right option for you, you can expect registered clinical counsellors and registered psychologists to work within a brief model of care to promote positive growth, well-being, and mental health at your sessions. A brief model of care is a therapeutic approach that is usually time-limited in structure, solutions-focused, goal-oriented, and collaborative. It’s up to you and your counsellor to determine the optimal length and frequency of your sessions, but often students find they can get the most support out of a few appointments depending on the topic of concern. 

There are many different kinds of therapeutic approaches that may work for you too, and other counselling options might include connecting with My SSP, finding a counsellor or specialist in the community, or joining a therapeutic group to foster a sense of belonging.

It’s important to remember that counselling is just one aspect of mental health support, and other professionals at Health & Counselling can include social workers, psychiatrists, nurses, and doctors or a combination of each. Groups or community-based supports can also focus on other ways to build skills and cope with challenges too and a blend of options may be most helpful. Art, meditation, prayer and cultural expression share many mental health benefits and can be great additions to your mental health journey if relevant, especially if you aren’t entirely comfortable in a conversational setting like counselling. 

Your mental health is important, and if you need support, connect with Health & Counselling for a counselling consultation appointment and to feel supported and guided through the many different services and professionals available. Also, browse through our list of resources to see what’s offered so you can stay connected to services and options that can help you thrive during your time at SFU. 

visibility  280
Jun 19, 2023

You Might Like These... Volunteering, Community Engagement, Professional Development, Personal Development, Life Balance

STC West Coast
Alumnus Profile: How Crystal Kwon Advanced Her Career Through Volunteerism

Students often overlook one important benefit of volunteerism. While students realize that scholarships and bursaries usually require community engagement, they often forget that volunteerism can also give you the edge you need after you finish your degree.

A woman fast asleep
Sleeping for Success at Work!

The days of pulling all nighters and getting by on 2-3 hours sleep are over! Getting enough sleep is essential to ensure you can keep up with the demands of a fulltime work schedule and put forth your best performance.

Life balance
Understanding Balance

When someone on campusasks you “how are you doing?” what do you usually say? More often than not it seems the answer is “busy” because, let’s face it, SFU students ARE busy.

You Might Like These... Life Balance

a bunch of cars stuck in traffic
Feeling Stuck? Put A Halt On It!

You know the feeling of being stuck. Whether in your personal, interpersonal, professional, or any other life, the sense of having fallen out of the groove is always similarly and markedly unpleasant. You're spinning your tires, expending lots of effort with seemingly no forward motion to thank for it. So how do you get out of this funk? Here's a simple strategy for getting "unstuck"

Monique Auger headshot
MA Student Seeks to Address Métis Mental Health Issues

Monique Auger, a proud Métis woman from Vancouver Island, thinks there is. She is using her Graduate Aboriginal Scholarship to pursue a master of science, in the Faculty of Health Sciences, to explore this issue.