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You have a lot going on and many goals you wish to achieve, so try combining them.

Your time is very valuable and while volunteering can be an amazing experience and very beneficial for your career, it is important to look for and choose the best volunteer position for you. Don’t volunteer randomly but wisely, and invest your time and efforts in a cause or position that is related to you in one way or another. Here are some tips on what to keep in mind when looking for that right volunteer position.

Find a Cause or an Issue That is Important to You.

Find out what you really care about in your local community or organizations. Do you care about a particular illness or a disease? Raising awareness about an issue? Maybe you wish to support a science or an art group? Is there a local group or community that you enjoy? Your volunteer commitment says a lot about you and your interests to friends, family, and even employers.

What Skills you Have to Offer?

What are you studying? What skills do you possess right now? What would you like to improve? Do you have any hobbies? Figure out what you bring to the table and what familiarity you have with certain equipment and software and then find a position that will allow you to jump right into the work without much training

Do you Want to Learn Something New?

Volunteering is a great way to learn a new skill or to gain exposure to a new environment. As a volunteer you are expected to be new to the system and to be trained. You can gain skills for your future employment or simply offer some fun from your daily routine.

Combine Your Goals.

You have a lot going on and many goals you wish to achieve, so try combining them. Look for a volunteer opportunity that is active to help you lose some weight, or pick up computer knowledge by volunteering to recycle to them.

Don't Overdo it.

Keep your schedule in check and try not to frustrate your family and friends, exhaust yourself, or neglect your volunteer job. Start out slowly and see what the job is like for a short time before committing yourself long term to a schedule you can't or don't want to fulfill.

SFU Student
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Dec 3, 2014

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