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International Association of Business Communicators, Canadian Public Relations Society
SFU Co-op Student

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Students can definitely broaden their horizons, explore new career paths, and build a network of professional contacts! Students get to be immersed in new cultures, meet new people, and develop professionally.

Have you ever considered travelling outside of Canada to work or study? Did you know that as an SFU student you have many opportunities to travel, and get credit for it? SFU International has an excellent exchange program in which you can work or study abroad!

If you have always wanted to travel to Denmark or Australia, for example, but could not find the time or resources to get there, going on an exchange program is an excellent way to seeing the world. Currently, there are two types of international programs: exchange and field school as well as international co-op. So what are the differences?

Doing an exchange allows you to study for one or two terms at one of SFU’s partner institutions, such as the University of Western Australia. Not only do you get to study elsewhere, courses you take pertaining to your degree is transferrable as credit towards your graduation. Instead of paying fees of an international student, the good news is you pay SFU tuition, meaning that it is a lot cheaper to study abroad!

A field school is similar. You get to travel abroad, only this time you travel with a group of students. Essentially, you are in a class led by an SFU professor, and most of the travel planning is done for you. Field schools are a little more versatile in that you may not always be staying in one place to learn.

If you choose to work abroad instead, there is the International Co-Op program offered by Work Integrated Learning. This is a unique opportunity to travel the world, while working in your specified field of study. You can definitely expand your career options by gaining this world experience.

So why international? Well, not only will you get to study academics in another country, but you get to develop yourself personally as well. You will become more self-aware, and discover what you like, and do not like. This is where many students will find themselves and discover what their interests and passions are. There is so much cultural experience to be gained, that will definitely open up your mind and make you a well-rounded person. You will also meet so many new people, and make new friendships, and this intrinsic value is very invaluable.

Students can definitely broaden their horizons, explore new career paths, and build a network of professional contacts! Students get to be immersed in new cultures, meet new people, and develop professionally.

Studying or working internationally is definitely a valuable and economical option for students wishing to travel and see the world. For a lot of students, they may not get an opportunity to travel after they graduate, so applying to study or work abroad is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Beyond the Blog

International Association of Business Communicators, Canadian Public Relations Society
SFU Co-op Student
Mike Wong is an aspiring Public Relations Professional, interested in Crisis Communications and Content Strategy. Connect with Mike on Twitter.

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