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Emily Feng

Arts + Social Sciences › Criminology
Peer Education › Career Peers

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With the transition back, we want you to know about the best ways to enjoy your life as a university student – virtually or at live events and activities.

The best ways to feel fulfilled at university is by loving your classes, getting grades you feel proud of – and getting involved in activities that are meaningful to you. This includes meeting new people and making friends! Read on to learn about some awesome events and options available to you.

It has been well over a year since we shifted to remote learning at SFU. With the transition back, we want you to know about the best ways to enjoy your life as a university student – virtually or at live events and activities.

Participate in SFU Month of Welcome Events

On September 7th, SFU begins the term with Welcome Day, a (virtual) one-day, university-wide welcome and orientation event for all SFU students. This is an opportunity for you to connect with fellow students and explore all that SFU has to offer, so make sure to attend!

Happening on the same day is the Virtual Services Fair, where you’ll be introduced to the services offered at SFU. This includes support throughout your degree for: academics, volunteering, financial aid and awards, health, finding work, safety, counselling, and much more. Don’t miss out!

Throughout September, there will be a variety of activities and events dedicated to helping you make new friends and discover new interests, so check these sites often for updates.

Volunteer or Work on Campus

One of the best ways to meet people is to volunteer, live or work on campus. When the fall semester is in session, take full advantage of services exclusive to students and check out Get Involved, SFU’s student hub for on-campus opportunities. There may be some postings that you’ll find interesting. Be sure to also visit the myInvolvement portal, where you can register for career and leadership development programs, apply for volunteer and paid positions, sign up for campus events and workshops, and access your Co-Curricular Record! If you are interested in getting involved in Peer programs, watch this site for recruitment details.

If you aren’t confident enough about your resume or cover letter to apply to any opportunities yet, meet with an SFU Career Peer to get some one-on-one tips and feedback on improving!

Join a Club or Student Union

Club activities were suspended in-person for the past year and a half, but that did not stop our SU’s and clubs from staying connected with each other on Discord. To chat with other SFU students, ask questions, and explore clubs that you’re interested in, join the Simon Fraser University discord server with over 3400 members! Clubs, student unions, and other student groups at SFU will often advertise any icebreakers, events, and workshops that are taking place in this discord.

You can also search clubs on the Simon Fraser Student Society page, attend clubs days, on September 15-17th or browse here for your faculty’s student union. Many of these student-run organizations have discord servers so that you can get connected with your peers. They also hire students every semester for volunteer work or as club executives, which is a perfect chance for anyone looking to gain some leadership experience.

Remote Opportunities

Lastly, some of us may not be fully comfortable with the idea of being back on campus yet. If you are looking for ways to get involved online, there are some options available to you as well! A good place to start is to first get some professional support and guidance from SFU’s Career Educators and by exploring your interests. The myInvolvement and myExperience portals displays both in-person and remote volunteer and work opportunities, so keep an eye out for the kind you’re looking for.

If you’re seeking remote jobs, a great tip from one of our Career Education Specialists, Jill Eddy, is to use search terms such as “virtual work, remote work” on job boards like Indeed, rather than searching for specific titles and trying to figure out whether you can work from home. This will bring up some great entry-level remote work opportunities. You might also filter results by jobs posted within the past 1-2 weeks to see the more recently posted opportunities.

You can also take part in the upcoming West Coast Virtual Fair, where you’ll be able to network with over one hundred employers, volunteer organizations and graduate schools. Register today and save the date October 5-7th. Read more about this exciting event here.

Students often regret not taking full advantage of everything available at university before they graduate, so we hope these ideas can help you get connected and building community again! Once you start getting involved on campus, you will truly feel like you’re a part of an amazing community of young leaders.

If you found this article helpful, make sure you subscribe to Career and Volunteer Service’s newsletter and follow us on Instagram for the latest career and volunteer resources and opportunities for SFU students.

Beyond the Blog

  • Curious what you can do with your degree? Book an appointment with one of our professional Career Education Specialists. It's quick and easy! Simply send an email to careers@sfu.ca.

  • Applying to jobs and need help with your resume, cover letter, or LinkedIn profile? Book an appointment with Career Peer Education to receive tips and feedback in a one-on-one advising session. 

Author

Image of Emily

Emily Feng

Arts + Social Sciences › Criminology
Peer Education › Career Peers

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